A Sneak Peek into Fashionably Yours by @Author_Swati !!!

Hello Readers !!!

Already feeling the winter chill with the onset of December? Time to pull out those fashionable winter wear lying in your closet and feel oh! so uber- chic!

Let’s give you a feel of it with the help of our sizzling December release by Swati Sharma titled “Fashionably Yours”.

What is the Book About?

FASHIONABLY YOURS COVER“Maya Kapoor swaps the snowy mountains for the glittering ocean.”

Maya Kapoor arrived in Mumbai with a glamorous dream, quite literally. Maya wants to be a serious fashion writer for the high-end fashion magazine, Glamorous, but luck is not in her favor. Instead, she lands a job with a local fashion magazine, Style. Maya hates everything about it but for now this is all she has. Despite all the odds, Maya is excited about living an independent, fashionable life in the city of dreams.

At twenty-five, love has eluded Maya. But when she bumps into the dashing photographer, Aryan Malik, she falls head over heels for his gorgeous smile and charming manner.

But Maya seems to be stuck in a rut – her credit card bills are sky-high, her melodramatic mother can’t stop ranting, the boss is unbearably cruel, her younger sister has decided to tie the knot, and she’s not sure if Aryan could love a simple, confused girl like her.

Will Maya get the fairytale life she dreamed about or will she let everything slip through her fingers? Read her diary and find out.

About the Author…

Swati Sharma is a born and bred Delhi product. Before dabbling into writing, she completed her post graduation in business.Before Fashionably Yours happened, Swati authored four coffee table books and has written for a lifestyle magazine.

One thing which very few people know that Swati is clairvoyant, and no it’s not a joke. She lives in Delhi with her extensive collection of nail polishes, lipsticks and with very

neat piles of books and magazines.

A Sneak Peak into “Fashionably Yours”….

As I pulled it open, I felt my heart flutter at the sight of a crisp, white envelope which was going to take me a step closer to my dream. Gingerly I reached inside the envelope

and pulled out a letter. I read the job offer for the zillionth time since it had arrived last evening.

Dear Maya Kapoor,

Congratulations! We are pleased to offer you the position of ‘Feature Writer’with the online division of Style magazine. Please find the attached draft copy of your offer letter from Style, Mumbai.

Do go through the letter and let us know if you have any

queries with regards to the offer.

I had waited for this letter for far too long. Though Style was not my first preference, I realized that Glamorous wastoo posh to recruit someone straight out of Shimla College

of Mass Communication and Advertising. But at least Style was situated in the same city as my bible. For the last sevenyears I had dreamt only one dream, and that was to write for Glamorous. And for this I had fought a tough battle againstmy mom who was adamant to see me graduate to become aCA or a primary school teacher at the very least. Yuk! Accordingto her, no decent man would marry a girl like me who

had had a word ‘media’ written in her bio.

“Girls in media are considered to have loose character.You have landed yourself in a dark pit,” she grumbled in my ear as we posed for a family photo on my convocation.

Gazing at the letter in my hands I wonder if she would throw me out of the house, dragging me by my hair or have a minor panic attack when I broke the news to her.

Fifteen minutes later I was out of the comfort of my bed and ready to spill the beans to my parents. I just wanted to be over with all the drama as soon as possible so that I could finally celebrate my job with a tall cup of hot chocolate before starting to pack my stuff. Trotting along the creaking wooden floor I walked up to my closet and pulled out a jumper to slide over my old GAP T-shirt. It was freezing. It had been a

week and it hadn’t stopped snowing.

Stay glued for more excerpts from “Fashionably Yours”

Happy Reading…

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Easy to read but tough to write – By Shoma Narayanan

The topic I started with originally was “Easy to read books are the toughest to write”.  Never having written a tough-to-read book myself, I didn’t feel up to making comparisons, and decided to stick with the challenges involved in writing a quick-read book.

Most easy-to-read books fall into a genre – thrillers/ romance/ detective fiction/ chick-lit.  Authors may argue with the labels all they want but they’re stuck with them.  And once you’re slotted into a genre, there are expectations that readers have from a book.  Obvious ones like not being allowed to kill off the hero in a romance novel, or have the heroine run away with a policeman.  Also not so obvious ones, like not making a character’s life and motivations too complicated.  Being realistic without being too grim.  Not encroaching into another genre.

Then there’s the writing style itself.  While most writers of popular fiction have a light style, there is the always the temptation to show people that you can manage something a lot more ‘literary’ if you want to.  I honestly don’t think that writing needs to be ‘heavy’ to have literary merit – similarly, the chances of a book winning the Booker do not increase exponentially with the number  long words and complicated plotlines.  What distinguishes popular fiction from other types of fiction is that it caters to a specific audience, and is written keeping that audience in mind.  It’s not the same as a book that ‘comes from within’, and is the creative outpouring of a literary mind, with no thought to ‘who’s going to read this’ or ‘how many copies will I sell’.

“How many copies will I sell’ is a pretty big thing for a popular fiction writer, and other than the writing itself, there’s a lot that goes into making the book a success.  But it still starts with the writing – no amount of PR or trade discounts will help a book that doesn’t have intrinsic merit.  Also, catering for a specific audience isn’t as simple as waking up in the morning and deciding “Oh, books on Indian mythology sell well, I should write one immediately”.

When I write, I usually have a few typical readers in mind, and I keep stopping to ask myself the question ‘Would so-and-so like this?’ Or “Is this section dragging – should I delete it?” Also, because my books sell in countries other than India, “Will this make sense to a non-Indian reader?”  Editing is crucial – often my editor will spot something that hasn’t occurred to me.

Making characters realistic yet appealing is another challenge.  The perfect hero of a romance novel is an incredibly hot alpha male who in addition to being tall, dark, handsome, sexy and rich, also needs to be capable of deep emotion and understanding.  It’s a bit of a tall order for the average male.  For the character to be believable, he needs to have flaws that make him seem more human but don’t detract from his overall appeal – if possible, they should add it to it!  So he can be reserved but not arrogant; impulsive but not immature; hot-tempered but not violent.  Endowing him with a sense of humour helps!  Similarly, the heroine can’t be seen telling lies or being overly insecure or whining about her lot in life.  If a reader stops sympathizing and identifying with the protagonist, the book loses its charm.

The last thing about writing popular fiction is the sheer volume that most authors of popular fiction churn out.  To retain reader interest, it’s important to keep up a steady stream of books in their favourite genre.  Switching genres, or having a big gap between two books doesn’t work very well, because you need to build up your readership all over again.

Having said all of this, there is something singularly satisfying in writing the kind of book that a reader looks forward to reading after a long and tiring day.  So while easy-to-read books might be tough to write, they bring a little more zing into both the author’s and the reader’s life.

Happy reading – and writing!

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